Swiss Defence League

Swiss Defence League

Carl Orff – O Fortuna ~ Carmina Burana
Thursday, March 22, 2018 8:28 PM



Kurdish Afrin Falls to Turkey
Thursday, March 22, 2018 3:51 PM

Who Are the Jihadists Fighting alongside Turkey in Syria? (III)
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 9:44 AM

What Turkey Is Doing Lately…
Destroying  Churches, Some Very Old, But Its A Way To Take Away Any Trace Of Christianity.
Crimea The People Of Crimea Did Vote And Prefered Orthodox Russia To Any Move From Turkey As Crimea Was In The Ottoman Empire And Erdogan Wanted It Back. Wanted Georgia Also,Another Under Conlict With Russia.
Killing Russian Ex-Spies, That If Russian Wanted Them Dead…They Just Be Dead A Long Ago. But NATO Is Shaken, Turkey Is One Of Its Member Anf If It Take Like Erdogan Said That He Want All Those Greek Islands And Cyprus.
While Fighting The Kurds, What A Busy Country…


  • The remaining 17 groups that make up the Syrian portion of Operation Olive Branch are a combination of Salafist, jihadist and ultra-extremist militants who have been either formed or supported by Turkey at various stages of Syria’s seven-year civil war.

In its offensive launched on January 20 against Kurdish fighters in northern Syria, Turkey has deployed more than 25,000 Syrian rebel fighters who have been equipped and trained by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s powerful military.

The offensive, code-named Operation Olive Branch, aims at dislodging the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) from the Kurdish enclave of Afrin. On March 18, Turkish military and allied jihadist rebels took control of Afrin’s city center. Turkey views the YPG as an extension of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), an insurgent group that has been fighting for greater Kurdish autonomy in Turkey’s southeast. Backed by the United States, the YPG has been instrumental in the U.S.-led war on terror in Syria since 2014.

Pictured: Turkish soldiers at an outpost on the Turkey-Syria border. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Nine days after the start of the operation, the pro-Turkish government website, Suriye Gundemi, published an infographic showing the Syrian rebel groups involved in the Afrin offensive. The website says that three divisions are part of the National Army that is under the command of the Syrian interim government, an anti-Syrian regime body based in Turkey.

This so-called army consists mainly of Islamist militants who were part of the most radical Islamic factions of the Free Syrian Army (FSA) at some point during the Syrian conflict, and was formed only two weeks prior to the Afrin operation. Most of these fighters fled to Turkey after they were defeated in battles across Syria, including in Damascus, Aleppo, Homs, Idlib and Hama. While in Turkey, they were recruited by Turkish intelligence agencies to be part of forces invading the Kurdish-held Afrin.

The remaining 17 groups that make up the Syrian portion of Operation Olive Branch are a combination of Salafist, jihadist and ultra-extremist militants who have been either formed or supported by Turkey at various stages of Syria’s seven-year civil war. The following is a rundown of these groups:

Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror Brigade

Named after the notorious Ottoman Sultan Mehmed the Conquerer, who ruled in the 15th century and violently conquered Constantinople and Southeast Europe, this ethnic Turkmen group was founded in 2012 at the height of the Aleppo battle. It controlled six districts in eastern Aleppo, imposing a set of sharia (Islamic) laws on local residents. The group commanders were also involved in criminal activities, such as robbery and human trafficking. The group was later embraced by the Turkish government, and thus it participated in Operation Euphrates Shield, another Turkish-led offensive in northern Syria, which ended in March 2017. It has close to 1,000 fighters.

The Sultan Murad Division

An extremist group established by Turkey in 2013, it receives direct financial, military and logistic support from Turkish armed forces. Most of its fighters are ethnic Turkmen. Prior to the Afrin offensive, it was primarily based in the city of Aleppo. The group has been involved in clashes with other rebel groups over revenue sharing of the Bab al-Salameh border crossing when a rival group decided to hand over the crossing to the main Syrian opposition body.

The Hamza Division

Founded in April 2016 in Turkey, it was one of the first Turkish-backed Syrian groups that entered the Syrian town of Jarablus in 2017 alongside the Turkish military. Adopting an extremist anti-Western Islamic ideology, the group strongly believes in the return of Ottoman rule over the entire Middle East.

The Sham Legion

Originally named the Homs Legion, the group that was established in March 2014, has nearly 4,000 fighters, making it the largest force within the Operation Olive Branch. It is a union of at least 19 Islamist groups affiliated with the Syrian branch of the Muslim Brotherhood. The group joined other rebel forces in forming the Fateh al-Sham operation center. It has been active in the provinces of Aleppo, Idlib and Homs. The group is currently led by Yasser Abdulrahim, a rebel leader known for changing sides based on funding sources.

TheShamiyah Front

The second largest rebel group participating in Operation Olive Branch, the Shamiyah Front is a union of Islamists and Salafists from Aleppo. Its members are largely remnants of the Nureddine al-Zanki Brigades and other extremist groups that were active in Aleppo in 2015. Supported by Turkey and Qatar, this rebel group believes that jihad is the only path for Syria to become an Islamic emirate governed by sharia law. It has an estimated 3,000 fighters.

The Mountain Falcons (Hawks) Brigade

Named after the Zawiyeh Mountain in the northwestern province of Idlib, the group was active in Idlib’s countryside. It was originally part of the Descendants of the Prophet Brigades. It clashed with the al-Nusra Front, al-Qaeda’s Syrian branch, over revenue and power sharing. Defeated by al-Nusra, its members were forced to flee to Turkey, before regrouping and joining the Afrin operation.

Jaysh al-Nasr

The group is made up of smaller groups that operated in Idlib, Hama and Latakia.

Al-Mustafa Regiment

Named after the Islamic prophet Mohammed’s title, the faction was founded in June 2016 with the financial and military support of Turkey. It participated in Operation Euphrates Shield.

Islamic Al-Waqqas Brigade

Named after Saad bin Abi Waqqas, a companion of the prophet Mohammed and the 17th person to embrace Islam, the group was formed in early 2016 by the Turkish government. It has nearly 1,000 well-trained fighters.

Turkmen Muntasir Billah Brigade

Named after al-Muntasir bi’llah, the Abbasid caliph who ruled in the 9th century, this Syrian rebel group has embraced a radical Islamic ideology since its inception in February 2014. Based in Aleppo and Raqqa, it has engaged in several battles with Syrian regime troops. The group welcomed the arrival of ISIS in Raqqa and did not attempt to challenge its rule. After Aleppo was retaken by the Syrian military, most of the group’s fighters fled to Turkey, where they went through an organizational restructuring. They played a central role in launching Operation Euphrates Shield.

TheSuleyman Shah Brigade

Named after Suleyman Shah, the father of Omsan I, founder of the Ottoman Empire, this group was formed in Turkey in April 2016 to participate in Operation Euphrates Shield. Its fighters are largely ethnic Turkmen, with a significant percentage of Sunni Arabs. It is currently led by Mohammed al-Jassim, also known as Abu al-‘Amsha.

Samarkand Brigade

Named after the Uzbek city of Samarkand, this is another Turkmen group that was formed by Turkey in April 2016. In its inaugural statement, it said that its main objective was to fight the Kurdish YPG. The group is led by Wael Musa.

The Elite Army, Jaish al-Shamal, Usood al-Fateheen Brigade, Ahrar al-Sharqiya Unit and Al-Awwal al-Magawir Brigade

These smaller groups that were formed in Syria and Turkey. Each group reportedly has 200-300 fighters who are commanded by the Turkish military and larger rebel groups.

Sirwan Kajjo is a Syrian-Kurdish Washington-based journalist and author.














A Cultural Political Melting Pot Seeking A Totalitarian Regime Under The Cover Of Religion
Monday, March 19, 2018 10:31 AM

Clic On The Speaker Button, To Get The Sound

“Whitewashing Islam: 20 Errors on 20/20”
Saturday, March 17, 2018 5:48 PM

Pastor David Wood :


Switzerland Has Lots Of Guns. But Its Gun Culture Takes Different Path From US.
Friday, March 9, 2018 11:49 AM

Marksmen fill the recreation hall of this sand-colored shooting club in the wooded hills outside Bern, capping off a weekend competition to commemorate the 1798 Battle of Grauholz in the French Revolutionary Wars.

There is no shortage of patriotism here – there is even a yodeling club dressed in traditional red-trimmed black felt jackets – and indeed, for many Swiss citizens, guns are as central to their identity as the Alps. Switzerland has one of the highest per capita rates of guns in the world. “Every Swiss village has a range just like this one,” says Renato Steffen, a top official of the Swiss Shooting Sports Association, representing the group at the event. The association counts 2,800 such clubs across the country, with a youth wing for children as young as 10.

If this seems like a scene that belongs in gun-loving America, there the similarities end. The Swiss’s historic relationship to their arms as members of a standing militia, their motives for keeping them, and the regulations around them diverge from the American experience. It’s one reason that the prevalence of arms here is not accompanied by a scourge of gun violence.

Yet Switzerland does provide clues for gun ownership in America. Here divisions also have emerged after gun tragedies and efforts to rein in use – and the story is not settled as a new gun-control directive comes from the European Union. But ultimately the two sides have found consensus, getting beyond polarization that paralyzes the American debate even after such tragedies as the school shooting in Parkland, Fla. Those who loathe guns here accept their deep-seated position in Swiss tradition as they push for more controls, while gun advocates have pushed back but ultimately accepted more rules and oversight in the past 15 years.

“We can live with the restrictions placed on us until now,” says Kaspar Jaun, president of the Battle of Grauholz association, before hurrying off to prepare for the awards ceremony for best marksman.

‘Sport and protection of country only’

There is no official count of guns in Switzerland. But according to the Geneva-based Small Arms Survey, Switzerland has more guns circulating per capita than any country besides the US and Yemen. The most recent government figures estimate about 2 million firearms in Swiss households. Conscription is mandatory for Swiss males, and citizen soldiers store their weapons at home, making up the bulk of guns in households today.

The militia, and the culture it has fostered, is seen as part of the common good, binding a nation together in a mission of national security. That differs widely from America’s individualistic gun culture. According to a Pew poll in 2017, 67 percent of those who own guns in the US cite their personal protection as a major motive.

And differences with the US don’t end at cultural ones. In Switzerland, regulations have become much more stringent since the free-wheeling days before a Weapons Act was put into place in 1999. And they have steadily tightened over the past 15 years. Military guns, once given to members after their service and passed down for generations, can now only be acquired after service with a firearms acquisition license. Since 2007, army-issued ammunition cannot be kept at home. A gun under the bed for self-protection? Impossible in Switzerland.

Loaded guns, whether military or for sport, cannot be carried on the streets here without a special permit which is rarely issued. Because of conscription, the Swiss are highly trained in weapons handling and storage. As he drives away from the shooting range Sunday, Mr. Steffen says he would never want the right to transport his army rifle loaded. “No, no,” he says, “that is crazy. For us, guns are for sport, and protection of our country, only.”

Switzerland does grapple with gun death rates higher than European neighbors, the vast majority of it suicide. Guns also play a troubling role in domestic disputes. But unlike the US, gun deaths out of self-defense are a rare phenomenon. Criminologist Martin Killias, at the University of St. Gallen’s law school, built a database looking at homicides committed in self-defense over a 25-year period ending in 2014. Of 1,464 homicides, in 23 cases defenders killed victims in self-defense or under duress. In 15 of those cases, a firearm was used, nine of which were the weapons of on-duty police officers.

The homicide rate in the US is about six times that of the Swiss national average. But when comparing domestic violence that ends in death with a firearm, the ratio is just under 2 to 1, a much smaller gap of gun deaths between American and Swiss households. “It is very illustrative,” Mr. Killias says. “It’s not so much that American people are more aggressive, or Swiss are so terribly more peaceful, it’s simply that gun use in the street [in the US] is quite common,” he says. “That is why robbery quite often ends with a shooting in America, whereas in Switzerland it is practically never the case.”

Switzerland’s gun debates

Nonetheless, the debate has still been divisive and bitter here. Josef Lang sits on the opposite end of the spectrum as men such as Steffen, and still receives hateful threats and messages over his role in the gun control movement in Switzerland.

A pacifist activist since the 1980s, Mr. Lang was a parliamentarian in 2001 in the canton of Zug when a gunman stormed the chamber. He ducked underneath the desk in time and survived, but nearly 20 years later he recounts vividly every second of the 2.5 minutes gun spree during which 14 of his colleagues around him were killed. He remembers the feeling of a bullet grazing his bushy hair.

With each incident, laws have tightened to get rid of loopholes. After the Zug massacre, gun control advocates pushed for cantonal police registries to be linked and for tighter controls for private gun sales. In 2006, after Swiss alpine skier Corinne Rey-Bellet and her brother were killed by Corinne’s estranged husband with his military rifle, rules banning the storage of military ammunition at home were created. Today, military members can choose to also keep their weapons at a central arsenal.

The battle hasn’t always favored gun control. In a 2011 referendum voters would have, among other things, required military arms to be stored in a central arsenal. Fifty-six percent voted against it. Today, many feel satisfied with where Switzerland is on gun control. “Swiss laws give freedom to the citizen but at the same time they attempt to reduce abuse with guns,” says Luca Filippini, the president of the Swiss Shooting Sports Association.

Switzerland’s reform history provides a lesson for the US, argues Erin Zimmerman, an American living in Switzerland who is a former US police officer and gun owner. While the country is vastly different from the US in demographics and population, she believes it shows the possibility of consensus for sensible gun regulations.

To underline the point, a nongovernmental organization she belongs to, Action Together: Zurich, led a fundraiser for the US-based nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety, timed to a visit to Zurich this week by former White House strategist Steve Bannon, who has resisted gun-reform efforts in the US.

While some US states have been able to pass gun reform, she says Americans in the national debate are too often only presented with “zero-sum” options. They are cast as simply pro- or anti-gun, making middle ground choices more elusive. “Switzerland has done a really good job of modeling that,” she says.

Creeping ‘Americanization’?

Now, however, the battle is heating up once more in Switzerland – and some worry about the creep of “American” mentalities. In response to the wave of terrorist attacks in Europe starting in 2015, the EU has imposed tighter gun restrictions. While Switzerland is not part of the bloc, it does belong to the passport-free Schengen area and so must adhere to EU rules.

Mr. Filippini argues the rules won’t have any bearing on terrorism, which is committed by criminals using illegal weapons and methods such as trucks. Gun advocates have promised to fight it in a referendum if it’s adopted into Swiss law and in general worry this is just the beginning of interference from the outside into their gun rules.

Both sides are staking their positions as gun-owning households in Switzerland has waned, in large part because the Swiss military has reduced its size by about sixfold since the 1990s. Today, 22 percent of households say they own guns, compared to 35 percent 15 years ago. Still, Lang worries about language he hears from the hard-line gun lobby about “self-protection,” against refugees and migrants or cuts in police budgets, a concept that is largely a taboo in Swiss society. Lang calls this the “Americanization” of the Swiss mentality.


Thursday, March 8, 2018 8:30 PM




Britain’s Top Clergyman Warns Against Sharia Law
Friday, March 2, 2018 7:24 PM

Britain’s Top Clergyman Warns Against Sharia Law

The Anglican Church’s highest ranked priest Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby slammed sharia law, Islam’s legal code, in his new book. He warned the British government never to recognize sharia as part of the legal system, calling it incompatible with Britain’s laws.

Welby argued that sharia is a competing values system which is at odds with Britain’s legal and moral traditions that are based on Christian ideas.

“There has been, and remains, a demand for the introduction of those aspects of sharia law that affect family and inheritance,” Lord Welby said. “The problem is re-imagining Britain through values applied in action can only work where the narrative of the country is coherent and embracing.

“Sharia, which has a powerful and ancient cultural narrative of its own, deeply embedded in a system of faith and understanding of God, and thus especially powerful in forming identity, cannot become part of another narrative. Accepting it in part implies accepting its values around the nature of the human person, attitudes to outsiders, the revelation of God, and a basis for life in law, rather than grace, the formative word of Christian culture.

“They face enormous pressures and need one legal basis of oversight and one philosophical foundation of understanding. For these reasons, I am especially sympathetic towards those Islamic groups that do not seek the application of sharia law into the family and inheritance law of this country.”

In particular, the Lord Welby commented on the push for polygamy by Islamist groups, in contrast to British laws enshrining marital monogamy.

Earlier this month the British government rejected findings recommending regulating sharia tribunals which currently operate in the UK performing Islamic marriages and providing other services for the Muslim community. The government declined to regulate the tribunals on the grounds that to do so would be to recognize sharia as an alternative legal system within the UK.

Lord Welby’s position on sharia is a marked shift from that of his predecessor, Lord Williams. The former archbishop of Canterbury said it was “unavoidable” that Britain would incorporate some aspects of sharia law. He called for “constructive accommodation with some aspects of Muslim law.”

Sharia is taken by many Muslims to mean a spiritual path of drawing closer to God and encompasses many rules surrounding prayer, permitted food and ritual. Some areas relating to criminal justice are incompatible with human rights, since they mandate the death penalty for adultery, blasphemy and homosexuality, along with other harsh punishments.

Sharia family law is at odds with Western positions on women’s rights. Women inherit half of what a man inherits and a man is allowed to take up to four wives. Divorce and custody laws are also biased in favor of the man.

Islamic feminist reformers are working on solutions to problems in sharia that are compatible to Islam.


Why Turkey Wants to Invade the Greek Islands
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 9:07 PM

by Uzay Bulut  •  February 28, 2018 at 5:00 am

  • Turkish propagandists also have been twisting facts to try to portray Greece as the aggressor.
  • Although Turkey knows that the islands are legally and historically Greek, Turkish authorities want to occupy and Turkify them, presumably to further the campaign of annihilating the Greeks, as they did in Anatolia from 1914 to 1923 and after.
  • Any attack against Greece should be treated as an attack against the West.

There is one issue on which Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) and its main opposition, the Republican People’s Party (CHP), are in complete agreement: The conviction that the Greek islands are occupied Turkish territory and must be reconquered. So strong is this determination that the leaders of both parties have openly threatened to invade the Aegean.

The only conflict on this issue between the two parties is in competing to prove which is more powerful and patriotic, and which possesses the courage to carry out the threat against Greece. While the CHP is accusing President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s AKP party of enabling Greece to occupy Turkish lands, the AKP is attacking the CHP, Turkey’s founding party, for allowing Greece to take the islands through the 1924 Treaty of Lausanne, the 1932 Turkish-Italian Agreements, and the 1947 Paris Treaty, which recognized the islands of the Aegean as Greek territory.

In 2016, Erdoğan said that Turkey “gave away” the islands that “used to be ours” and are “within shouting distance.” “There are still our mosques, our shrines there,” he said, referring to the Ottoman occupation of the islands.

Two months earlier, at the “Conference on Turkey’s New Security Concept,” Erdoğan declared: “Lausanne… has never been a sacred text. Of course, we will discuss it and struggle to have a better one.” Subsequently, pro-government media outlets published maps and photos of the islands in the Aegean, calling them the territory that “Erdoğan says we gave away at Lausanne.”

To realize his ultimate goal of leaving behind a legacy that surpasses that of all other Turkish leaders, Erdoğan has set certain objectives for the year 2023, the 100th anniversary of the establishment of the Turkish Republic, and 2071, the 1,000th anniversary of the 1071 Battle of Manzikert, during which Muslim Turkic jihadists from Central Asia defeated Christian Greek Byzantine forces in the Armenian highland of the Byzantine Empire.

The idea behind these goals is to create nationalistic cohesion towards annexing more land to Turkey. To alter the borders of Turkey, however, Erdoğan must change or annul the Lausanne Treaty. Ironically, ahead of his two-day official visit to Greece in December — touted as a sign of a new era in Turkish-Greek relations — Erdogan told Greek journalists that the Lausanne Treaty is in need of an update. During his trip, the first official visit to Greece by a Turkish head of state in 65 years, Erdoğan repeated his mantra that the Lausanne Treaty must be revised.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has said that Turkey “gave away” Greek islands that “used to be ours” and are “within shouting distance”. “There are still our mosques, our shrines there,” he said, referring to the Ottoman occupation of the islands. (Photo by Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

The following month, Erdoğan targeted CHP leader Kemal Kılıçdaroğlu, again accusing the party that signed the Lausanne Treaty of giving away the islands during negotiations. “We will tell our nation about [this],” Erdoğan said. What this statement means is that Erdogan accepts that the islands legally belong to Greece. Yet, at the same time, he calls the Greek possession of the territory “an invasion” — apparently because the islands were once within the borders of the Ottoman Empire — and he now wants them back.

Meanwhile, the CHP has been equally aggressive in its rhetoric, with Kılıçdaroğlu telling the Turkish parliament that Greece has “occupied” 18 islands. When Greek Defense Minister Panos Kammenos was described as “uncomfortable” with this statement, CHP’s deputy leader for foreign affairs, Öztürk Yılmaz, responded, “Greece should not test our patience.” Yılmaz also reportedly stated that “Turkey is much more than its government,” and that any Greek minister who provokes Turkey, will be “hit with a sledgehammer on the head…If [Kammenos] looks at history, he will see many examples of that.”

History is, in fact, filled with examples of Turks carrying out murderous assaults against Anatolian Greeks. In one instance, the genocidal assault against Greek and Armenian Christians in Izmir in 1922 was highlighted in a speech before the parliament by Devlet Bahceli, the head of the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP):

“If they [the Greeks] want to fall into the sea again — if they feel like being chased after again — they are welcome. The Turkish nation is ready and has the faith to do it again. Someone must explain to the Greek government what happened in 1921 and 1922. If there is no one to explain it to them, we know how to stick like a bullet on the Aegean, rain from the sky like a blessed victory, and teach history to the couriers of ahl al-salib [the people of the cross] all over again.”

Turkish propagandists also have been twisting facts to try to portray Greece as the aggressor. Ümit Yalım, former secretary-general of the Ministry of National Defense, for example, said that “Greece has turned the Greek-occupied islands into arsenals and military outposts that Greece will use in its future military intervention against Turkey.”

Turkish politicians all seem to have their own motivations for their obsession with the islands: Traditional Turkish expansionism, Turkification of Hellenic lands, neo-Ottomanism and Islam’s flagship of conquest — jihad. There are also strategic reasons for their wanting to invade the islands, which can be understood in a statement made by Deputy Prime Minister Tuğrul Türkeş about Turkey’s control of Cyprus since 1974:

“There is this misinformation that Turkey is interested in Cyprus because there is a Turkish society there… Even if no Turks lived in Cyprus, Turkey would still have a Cyprus issue and it is impossible for Turkey to give up on that.”

The same attitude and mentality apply to the Aegean islands. Although Turkey knows that the islands are legally and historically Greek, Turkish authorities want to occupy and Turkify them, presumably to further the campaign of annihilating the Greeks, as they did in Anatolia from 1914 to 1923 and after. The destruction of any remnant of Greek culture that existed in Asia Minor, a Greek land prior to the 11th century Turkish invasion, is almost complete. There are fewer than 2,000 Greeks left in Turkey today.

Given that Turkey brutally invaded Cyprus in 1974, its current threats against Greece — from both ends of Turkey’s political spectrum — should not be taken lightly by the West. Greece is the birthplace of Western civilization. It borders the European Union. Any attack against Greece should be treated as an attack against the West. It is time for the West, which has remained silent in the face of Turkish atrocities, to stand up to Ankara.

Uzay Bulut is a Turkish journalist born and raised in Turkey. She is presently based in Washington D.C.

What Do They Have In Common ?
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 6:46 PM

Europe Is Killing Itself
Friday, February 9, 2018 9:51 AM

The Truth May Scare You! (2018)
Sunday, February 4, 2018 4:18 PM



Sound Of The Crowd
Sunday, February 4, 2018 12:28 PM


Sound Of The Crowd


120 dB Alarm








White Flight: Diversity Extremes Push Londoners’ Exodus
Monday, January 29, 2018 8:06 PM




The Suppressed & Hidden History of Islam
Monday, January 29, 2018 8:34 AM


20 oct. 2013

Banned in some countries. A UK seasoned history author attempts to find archaeological evidence for the alleged Arabian Prophet of Islam outside of the Qur’an/Hadiths having access to latest findings, venturing to the lands in question seeking hard key historical evidence. Also, R. Spencer’s book “Did Muhammad Exist?” review; “Essentially, Spencer maintains that the Arabian empire came first, the theology came later.” He concludes: “A careful investigation makes at least one thing clear: The details of Muhammad’s life that have been handed down as canonical—that he unified Arabia by the force of arms, concluded alliances, married wives, legislated for his community, and did so much else—are a creation of political ferment dating from long after the time he is supposed to have lived. Similarly, the records strongly indicate that the Qur’an did not exist until long after it was supposed to have been delivered to the prophet of Islam.” “Did Muhammad exist? As a prophet of the Arabs who taught a vaguely defined monotheism, he may have existed. But beyond that, his life story is lost in the mists of legend, like those of Robin Hood & Macbeth. As the prophet of Islam, who received (or even claimed to receive) the perfect copy of the perfect eternal book from the supreme God, Muhammad almost certainly did not exist. There are too many gaps, too many silences, too many aspects of the historical record that simply do not accord, and cannot be made to accord, with the traditional account of the Arabian prophet teaching his Qur’an, energizing his followers to such an extent that they went out and conquered a good part of the world.” (pp.214-215)

How will Muslims respond to this book? Some may seek to curse the author. They may respond in outrage. But that will not disprove the facts presented here. Islam is supposed to be a religion based in history. It is supposed to be a religion of reason. But if history will not support the claims of Islam, is it time for Muslims to rethink the legitimacy of Islam? Blind commitment to the teachings of the local imam will not be enough in this age of instant information and verification of facts”…

Tom Holland’s response to criticism of his documentary;

Note by A2T-DoJtC: In SyroAramaic which much of Arabic comes out of, the word “Muhammad” is not a proper name but an honourable title “The Praised/Anointed One”, a SyroAramaic title reference to “The Christ” of the Bible in Syria + vicinity indisputably proven by historical evidence then it would have of an Arab Prophet unable to be found outside of the Qu’ran/Hadiths minus a few spurious sources from MONKS (big hint) unable to be corroborated/verified by other contemporaneous sources satisfactorily, thus being pseudopigraphica’s based in Mystery Religions, thereby being suspect as to grave error in translation understanding either by deliberate device for men’s desire to conquer the world or due to general illiteracy of such populations of these times in such areas which would have aided significantly in dispersing the erroneous translation definition. Is the circa 1306+ year old story of an “Arab Prophet” built on honest history or is it a corrupted version of various astro-polytheistic pagan & heathen nature religions of southern Mesopotamia merged w/ certain corrupted versions of Biblical stories adopted by the Arab mind thus being understood in a philosophical, mystic, heathen context w/ only touches of Abrahamic chronicles when seen through the lens of verifiable history? For the student whom diligently, rigorously seeks & studies factual ancient/classical history, digs even deeper, they’ll find Islam’s monotheistic position begins when Constantinople “Christianity” (OT & NT) has already been in the same areas since circa mid 3rd century A.D. seeking converts. Could modern Islam be a Roman-Greco Byzantine cult that could be called ‘Arabian Arianism’ intermingled consequently w/ various anti-biblical ideologies/religions of different flavours which RomanGreco “Christianity” basically is depending on where it is in the world as in the case of Islam, thus giving Islam it’s start around 700AD (official evidence, not tradition) w/ eerie clues being how closely the head-dress of an Islamic women and Roman & Constantinople nun’s covering is for example? Or is Islam a more nefarious strategy by Rome’s Mystery Religion agents through murder & suppression of true history among other things to use as a fierce attack dog for decimating the world population, as is already occurring in order to usher in a One World Order?

In the above documentary, some either know an “Arabian Prophet” is myth into reality and are being dishonest, or they are unaware of such evidence.

Did an alleged “Arabian Prophet” with the alleged ‘name’ of “Muhammad” actually exist, or is this really a synagogue of satan Romano-Iudeo deception?

Who Need Musical Instruments…
Thursday, January 25, 2018 5:56 PM

The Sheltering Sky- King Crimson. A-Cappella by Petra Haden

King Crimson – Sheltering Sky (Original Version)

The One Finger Sign….
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 7:26 PM

The One Finger Sign….

The gesture is alluding to tawhid, the indivisible oneness concept of monotheism in Islam.All adherents to the Muslim faith believe in tawhid. Thus, many mainstream Muslims believe that ISIL militants have corrupted the meaning of this symbol, which has a history of being used in a non-violent manner …

Break on Through







Watch Tucker Carlson Brilliantly Expose Lindha Sarsour ..
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 2:20 PM


Stiff Upper Lip (The UK in the 21st Century)
Friday, January 19, 2018 7:21 PM